For women with postmenopausal osteoporosis at high risk for fracture

Knowledge powers osteoferocious women

It’s important to work closely with your doctor to understand your treatment options. Together, you may find ways to help manage your postmenopausal osteoporosis.

Unlike other conditions, there is no one specialist for osteoporosis. It can be hard choosing the right doctor to treat it. You should discuss your options with the doctor you feel will be most proactive in helping you lower the chance of a future fracture.

Download a guide to help you talk with your doctor about osteoporosis''

These are some of the types of doctors who treat osteoporosis

''
Primary care physicians

Primary care physicians know your medical history and lifestyle. They can treat osteoporosis, or will refer you to a specialist if needed.

''
Gynecologists

Gynecologists focus on women’s health. They can discuss lifestyle factors that may affect bone health and osteoporosis risk related to the onset of menopause.

''
Rheumatologists

Rheumatologists treat patients with age-related bone diseases. They can diagnose and treat osteoporosis.

''
Endocrinologists

Endocrinologists, who see patients with hormone-related issues, also manage the treatment of metabolic disorders such as osteoporosis.

''
Orthopedic surgeons

An orthopedic surgeon may fix your fracture. They can also be involved in a follow-up diagnosis and osteoporosis treatment plan.

Remember, the doctor who treats your fracture might not treat your osteoporosis. If you’ve had a fracture, be sure all of your doctors are aware of it.

''

Have a conversation about postmenopausal osteoporosis and TYMLOS at your next doctor visit.

Be proactive and get osteoferocious

Tips for talking to your doctors:

  • Bring up your concerns about postmenopausal osteoporosis. Be informed and ask questions
  • Schedule regular checkups and visits
  • Use the Doctor Discussion Guide for a more productive conversation

Ready to

''

Osteoporosis?

GO NOW
how-postmenopausal-osteoporosis-happens how-postmenopausal-osteoporosis-happens

What is the most important information I should know about TYMLOS? Read more

TYMLOS may cause serious side effects including: Possible bone cancer (osteosarcoma). During animal drug testing, TYMLOS caused some rats to develop a bone cancer called osteosarcoma. It is not known if people who take TYMLOS will have a higher chance of getting osteosarcoma. READ MORE

What is the most important information I should know about TYMLOS?

TYMLOS may cause serious side effects including: Possible bone cancer (osteosarcoma). During animal drug testing, TYMLOS caused some rats to develop a bone cancer called osteosarcoma. It is not known if people who take TYMLOS will have a higher chance of getting osteosarcoma. READ MORE